Puma launches Arsenal kit 
The campaign promoting Puma and Arsenal’s partnership is based on the concept, ‘Stronger Together’, and Bonner says Puma has sought to link both brands’ (yes, Arsenal is now a brand) record of innovation. “Both have a lot of firsts - Puma launched the first kit for a continent [the African Unity strip] and the first all in one kit for Cameroon. Arsenal was the first team to have numbers on their shirts, and the first to play under floodlights.”
The campaign is divided into three strands - Future, Forever, Victorious - which each represent a different kit. Forever (the red home kit) supposedly represents Arsenal’s heritage, while the away is titled Victorious after, apparently, the succesful away games Arsenal have enjoyed. The third, Future, will be used for European matches and by the club’s youth teams, and Puma says it represents Arsenal’s focus on the future and on nurturing new talent. It is supposedly the first Arsenal kit to have diagonal stripes - or lime green, for that matter.
In the weeks leading up to last night’s kit launch a series of 15-second teaser videos were released, showing footage of Arsenal players and fans sharing reflections on the club, its history and its future. Each feature snippets of conversation, quick cuts and a bass-heavy soundtrack, building a sense of suspense before revealing the launch date and Stronger Together hashtag. Puma launches Arsenal kit 
The campaign promoting Puma and Arsenal’s partnership is based on the concept, ‘Stronger Together’, and Bonner says Puma has sought to link both brands’ (yes, Arsenal is now a brand) record of innovation. “Both have a lot of firsts - Puma launched the first kit for a continent [the African Unity strip] and the first all in one kit for Cameroon. Arsenal was the first team to have numbers on their shirts, and the first to play under floodlights.”
The campaign is divided into three strands - Future, Forever, Victorious - which each represent a different kit. Forever (the red home kit) supposedly represents Arsenal’s heritage, while the away is titled Victorious after, apparently, the succesful away games Arsenal have enjoyed. The third, Future, will be used for European matches and by the club’s youth teams, and Puma says it represents Arsenal’s focus on the future and on nurturing new talent. It is supposedly the first Arsenal kit to have diagonal stripes - or lime green, for that matter.
In the weeks leading up to last night’s kit launch a series of 15-second teaser videos were released, showing footage of Arsenal players and fans sharing reflections on the club, its history and its future. Each feature snippets of conversation, quick cuts and a bass-heavy soundtrack, building a sense of suspense before revealing the launch date and Stronger Together hashtag. Puma launches Arsenal kit 
The campaign promoting Puma and Arsenal’s partnership is based on the concept, ‘Stronger Together’, and Bonner says Puma has sought to link both brands’ (yes, Arsenal is now a brand) record of innovation. “Both have a lot of firsts - Puma launched the first kit for a continent [the African Unity strip] and the first all in one kit for Cameroon. Arsenal was the first team to have numbers on their shirts, and the first to play under floodlights.”
The campaign is divided into three strands - Future, Forever, Victorious - which each represent a different kit. Forever (the red home kit) supposedly represents Arsenal’s heritage, while the away is titled Victorious after, apparently, the succesful away games Arsenal have enjoyed. The third, Future, will be used for European matches and by the club’s youth teams, and Puma says it represents Arsenal’s focus on the future and on nurturing new talent. It is supposedly the first Arsenal kit to have diagonal stripes - or lime green, for that matter.
In the weeks leading up to last night’s kit launch a series of 15-second teaser videos were released, showing footage of Arsenal players and fans sharing reflections on the club, its history and its future. Each feature snippets of conversation, quick cuts and a bass-heavy soundtrack, building a sense of suspense before revealing the launch date and Stronger Together hashtag. Puma launches Arsenal kit 
The campaign promoting Puma and Arsenal’s partnership is based on the concept, ‘Stronger Together’, and Bonner says Puma has sought to link both brands’ (yes, Arsenal is now a brand) record of innovation. “Both have a lot of firsts - Puma launched the first kit for a continent [the African Unity strip] and the first all in one kit for Cameroon. Arsenal was the first team to have numbers on their shirts, and the first to play under floodlights.”
The campaign is divided into three strands - Future, Forever, Victorious - which each represent a different kit. Forever (the red home kit) supposedly represents Arsenal’s heritage, while the away is titled Victorious after, apparently, the succesful away games Arsenal have enjoyed. The third, Future, will be used for European matches and by the club’s youth teams, and Puma says it represents Arsenal’s focus on the future and on nurturing new talent. It is supposedly the first Arsenal kit to have diagonal stripes - or lime green, for that matter.
In the weeks leading up to last night’s kit launch a series of 15-second teaser videos were released, showing footage of Arsenal players and fans sharing reflections on the club, its history and its future. Each feature snippets of conversation, quick cuts and a bass-heavy soundtrack, building a sense of suspense before revealing the launch date and Stronger Together hashtag.

Puma launches Arsenal kit 

The campaign promoting Puma and Arsenal’s partnership is based on the concept, ‘Stronger Together’, and Bonner says Puma has sought to link both brands’ (yes, Arsenal is now a brand) record of innovation. “Both have a lot of firsts - Puma launched the first kit for a continent [the African Unity strip] and the first all in one kit for Cameroon. Arsenal was the first team to have numbers on their shirts, and the first to play under floodlights.”

The campaign is divided into three strands - Future, Forever, Victorious - which each represent a different kit. Forever (the red home kit) supposedly represents Arsenal’s heritage, while the away is titled Victorious after, apparently, the succesful away games Arsenal have enjoyed. The third, Future, will be used for European matches and by the club’s youth teams, and Puma says it represents Arsenal’s focus on the future and on nurturing new talent. It is supposedly the first Arsenal kit to have diagonal stripes - or lime green, for that matter.

In the weeks leading up to last night’s kit launch a series of 15-second teaser videos were released, showing footage of Arsenal players and fans sharing reflections on the club, its history and its future. Each feature snippets of conversation, quick cuts and a bass-heavy soundtrack, building a sense of suspense before revealing the launch date and Stronger Together hashtag.

(Source: creativereview.co.uk)

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard

OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.

This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

(Source: behance.net)

3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin 3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin 3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin 3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin 3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin 3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin 3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin 3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin 3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin

3 Jazz Art festival by Marta Gawin

A series of typographic puns by Monsieur Cabinet. A series of typographic puns by Monsieur Cabinet. A series of typographic puns by Monsieur Cabinet.

A series of typographic puns by Monsieur Cabinet.

(Source: monsieurcabinet.com)

Creative Weapons by Sime GRZUNOV Creative Weapons by Sime GRZUNOV Creative Weapons by Sime GRZUNOV Creative Weapons by Sime GRZUNOV Creative Weapons by Sime GRZUNOV Creative Weapons by Sime GRZUNOV Creative Weapons by Sime GRZUNOV

Creative Weapons by Sime GRZUNOV

(Source: behance.net)

Tate Britain, Welcome To London
Posters are getting interesting. We’ve recently seen brilliant responsive digital posters for BA and Swedish haircare firm Apotek Hjärtat, and now Tate Britain has launched an ad campaign which features different combinations of images and text depending on the time of day, the weather and even the presence of a full moon. The work, created by Liveposter, is our Ad of the Week.

The aim of the campaign is to showcase the Tate Britain archive in a fun and unexpected way. It is displayed on two poster stands in West London, which are divided by a busy dual carriageway. Liveposter has created an algorithm that automatically produces different posters that are relevant to the audience at the specific moment they are passing. Apparently 10 million unique poster combinations can be created, with triggers including traffic speed (if the road is slow, longer copy will appear), the time of day, and the weather. Here are some examples of the combinations that may crop up: Tate Britain, Welcome To London
Posters are getting interesting. We’ve recently seen brilliant responsive digital posters for BA and Swedish haircare firm Apotek Hjärtat, and now Tate Britain has launched an ad campaign which features different combinations of images and text depending on the time of day, the weather and even the presence of a full moon. The work, created by Liveposter, is our Ad of the Week.

The aim of the campaign is to showcase the Tate Britain archive in a fun and unexpected way. It is displayed on two poster stands in West London, which are divided by a busy dual carriageway. Liveposter has created an algorithm that automatically produces different posters that are relevant to the audience at the specific moment they are passing. Apparently 10 million unique poster combinations can be created, with triggers including traffic speed (if the road is slow, longer copy will appear), the time of day, and the weather. Here are some examples of the combinations that may crop up: Tate Britain, Welcome To London
Posters are getting interesting. We’ve recently seen brilliant responsive digital posters for BA and Swedish haircare firm Apotek Hjärtat, and now Tate Britain has launched an ad campaign which features different combinations of images and text depending on the time of day, the weather and even the presence of a full moon. The work, created by Liveposter, is our Ad of the Week.

The aim of the campaign is to showcase the Tate Britain archive in a fun and unexpected way. It is displayed on two poster stands in West London, which are divided by a busy dual carriageway. Liveposter has created an algorithm that automatically produces different posters that are relevant to the audience at the specific moment they are passing. Apparently 10 million unique poster combinations can be created, with triggers including traffic speed (if the road is slow, longer copy will appear), the time of day, and the weather. Here are some examples of the combinations that may crop up: Tate Britain, Welcome To London
Posters are getting interesting. We’ve recently seen brilliant responsive digital posters for BA and Swedish haircare firm Apotek Hjärtat, and now Tate Britain has launched an ad campaign which features different combinations of images and text depending on the time of day, the weather and even the presence of a full moon. The work, created by Liveposter, is our Ad of the Week.

The aim of the campaign is to showcase the Tate Britain archive in a fun and unexpected way. It is displayed on two poster stands in West London, which are divided by a busy dual carriageway. Liveposter has created an algorithm that automatically produces different posters that are relevant to the audience at the specific moment they are passing. Apparently 10 million unique poster combinations can be created, with triggers including traffic speed (if the road is slow, longer copy will appear), the time of day, and the weather. Here are some examples of the combinations that may crop up:

Tate Britain, Welcome To London

Posters are getting interesting. We’ve recently seen brilliant responsive digital posters for BA and Swedish haircare firm Apotek Hjärtat, and now Tate Britain has launched an ad campaign which features different combinations of images and text depending on the time of day, the weather and even the presence of a full moon. The work, created by Liveposter, is our Ad of the Week.

The aim of the campaign is to showcase the Tate Britain archive in a fun and unexpected way. It is displayed on two poster stands in West London, which are divided by a busy dual carriageway. Liveposter has created an algorithm that automatically produces different posters that are relevant to the audience at the specific moment they are passing. Apparently 10 million unique poster combinations can be created, with triggers including traffic speed (if the road is slow, longer copy will appear), the time of day, and the weather. Here are some examples of the combinations that may crop up:

No Brainer
No Brainer is a new independent music magazine. Each issue will feature work from a guest designer, with Matt(H)Booth’s illustrations based on sound data featuring in the launch issue. 
No Brainer is a collaboration between Manchester based designer and illustrator Richard Pay and two music writers Andy Hughes and Ben Forrester. “We wanted to put together a no-frills magazine that celebrated new and alternative music with great quality at the heart of it from design to editorial. Most of the illustrations within the publication are inspired by artwork from the artists, sometimes in very broad ways,” says Pay. 

Each issue will feature a guest designer. For the first one, Matt(H)Booth created a series of illustrations derived from sound data from tracks featured in the magazine. No Brainer
No Brainer is a new independent music magazine. Each issue will feature work from a guest designer, with Matt(H)Booth’s illustrations based on sound data featuring in the launch issue. 
No Brainer is a collaboration between Manchester based designer and illustrator Richard Pay and two music writers Andy Hughes and Ben Forrester. “We wanted to put together a no-frills magazine that celebrated new and alternative music with great quality at the heart of it from design to editorial. Most of the illustrations within the publication are inspired by artwork from the artists, sometimes in very broad ways,” says Pay. 

Each issue will feature a guest designer. For the first one, Matt(H)Booth created a series of illustrations derived from sound data from tracks featured in the magazine. No Brainer
No Brainer is a new independent music magazine. Each issue will feature work from a guest designer, with Matt(H)Booth’s illustrations based on sound data featuring in the launch issue. 
No Brainer is a collaboration between Manchester based designer and illustrator Richard Pay and two music writers Andy Hughes and Ben Forrester. “We wanted to put together a no-frills magazine that celebrated new and alternative music with great quality at the heart of it from design to editorial. Most of the illustrations within the publication are inspired by artwork from the artists, sometimes in very broad ways,” says Pay. 

Each issue will feature a guest designer. For the first one, Matt(H)Booth created a series of illustrations derived from sound data from tracks featured in the magazine. No Brainer
No Brainer is a new independent music magazine. Each issue will feature work from a guest designer, with Matt(H)Booth’s illustrations based on sound data featuring in the launch issue. 
No Brainer is a collaboration between Manchester based designer and illustrator Richard Pay and two music writers Andy Hughes and Ben Forrester. “We wanted to put together a no-frills magazine that celebrated new and alternative music with great quality at the heart of it from design to editorial. Most of the illustrations within the publication are inspired by artwork from the artists, sometimes in very broad ways,” says Pay. 

Each issue will feature a guest designer. For the first one, Matt(H)Booth created a series of illustrations derived from sound data from tracks featured in the magazine. No Brainer
No Brainer is a new independent music magazine. Each issue will feature work from a guest designer, with Matt(H)Booth’s illustrations based on sound data featuring in the launch issue. 
No Brainer is a collaboration between Manchester based designer and illustrator Richard Pay and two music writers Andy Hughes and Ben Forrester. “We wanted to put together a no-frills magazine that celebrated new and alternative music with great quality at the heart of it from design to editorial. Most of the illustrations within the publication are inspired by artwork from the artists, sometimes in very broad ways,” says Pay. 

Each issue will feature a guest designer. For the first one, Matt(H)Booth created a series of illustrations derived from sound data from tracks featured in the magazine.

No Brainer

No Brainer is a new independent music magazine. Each issue will feature work from a guest designer, with Matt(H)Booth’s illustrations based on sound data featuring in the launch issue. 

No Brainer is a collaboration between Manchester based designer and illustrator Richard Pay and two music writers Andy Hughes and Ben Forrester. “We wanted to put together a no-frills magazine that celebrated new and alternative music with great quality at the heart of it from design to editorial. Most of the illustrations within the publication are inspired by artwork from the artists, sometimes in very broad ways,” says Pay. 

Each issue will feature a guest designer. For the first one, Matt(H)Booth created a series of illustrations derived from sound data from tracks featured in the magazine.

(Source: creativereview.co.uk)

Coca-Cola mini kiosks by ogilvy & mather berlin promote tiny coke cans
To promote the launch of its tiny coke cans, coca-cola and advertising agency ogilvy & mather berlin deployed and installed a series of miniature kiosks throughout five different major cities in Germany. 
According to adweek, the kiosks sold an average of 380 mini cans per day, which ogilvy says is 278 percent more than a typical coke vending machine. the small scale intervention included a pint-size vending machine, which also served to describe the the print campaign’s main motto: ‘it’s the little things in life that make us happy’.

Coca-Cola mini kiosks by ogilvy & mather berlin promote tiny coke cans
To promote the launch of its tiny coke cans, coca-cola and advertising agency ogilvy & mather berlin deployed and installed a series of miniature kiosks throughout five different major cities in Germany. 
According to adweek, the kiosks sold an average of 380 mini cans per day, which ogilvy says is 278 percent more than a typical coke vending machine. the small scale intervention included a pint-size vending machine, which also served to describe the the print campaign’s main motto: ‘it’s the little things in life that make us happy’.

Coca-Cola mini kiosks by ogilvy & mather berlin promote tiny coke cans
To promote the launch of its tiny coke cans, coca-cola and advertising agency ogilvy & mather berlin deployed and installed a series of miniature kiosks throughout five different major cities in Germany. 
According to adweek, the kiosks sold an average of 380 mini cans per day, which ogilvy says is 278 percent more than a typical coke vending machine. the small scale intervention included a pint-size vending machine, which also served to describe the the print campaign’s main motto: ‘it’s the little things in life that make us happy’.

Coca-Cola mini kiosks by ogilvy & mather berlin promote tiny coke cans

To promote the launch of its tiny coke cans, coca-cola and advertising agency ogilvy & mather berlin deployed and installed a series of miniature kiosks throughout five different major cities in Germany. 

According to adweek, the kiosks sold an average of 380 mini cans per day, which ogilvy says is 278 percent more than a typical coke vending machine. the small scale intervention included a pint-size vending machine, which also served to describe the the print campaign’s main motto: ‘it’s the little things in life that make us happy’.

(Source: designboom.com)

How a Brazilian street artist and a Leeds design studio created Coke’s World Cup identity
The visual identity system for Coca-Cola’s Brazil World Cup campaign was a collaborative effort between São Paulo street artist Speto and Leeds design studio BGO.

How a Brazilian street artist and a Leeds design studio created Coke’s World Cup identity

The visual identity system for Coca-Cola’s Brazil World Cup campaign was a collaborative effort between São Paulo street artist Speto and Leeds design studio BGO.

(Source: creativereview.co.uk)

Amy Woodside has some new paintings and a sweatshirt range to boot!
It’s been a while since we last checked in on Amy Woodside but the New Zealand-born, New York-based graphic artist has been as busy as ever. She’s a creative whose long been fascinated by the visual properties and potential of text and some of her new word-based work explores these qualities in quite an abstract way. She has also just launched a set of printed sweatshirts with the AYR brand, giving some of her pattern work a new lease of life on the sternums of trendy young things the world over. Nice. Amy Woodside has some new paintings and a sweatshirt range to boot!
It’s been a while since we last checked in on Amy Woodside but the New Zealand-born, New York-based graphic artist has been as busy as ever. She’s a creative whose long been fascinated by the visual properties and potential of text and some of her new word-based work explores these qualities in quite an abstract way. She has also just launched a set of printed sweatshirts with the AYR brand, giving some of her pattern work a new lease of life on the sternums of trendy young things the world over. Nice. Amy Woodside has some new paintings and a sweatshirt range to boot!
It’s been a while since we last checked in on Amy Woodside but the New Zealand-born, New York-based graphic artist has been as busy as ever. She’s a creative whose long been fascinated by the visual properties and potential of text and some of her new word-based work explores these qualities in quite an abstract way. She has also just launched a set of printed sweatshirts with the AYR brand, giving some of her pattern work a new lease of life on the sternums of trendy young things the world over. Nice. Amy Woodside has some new paintings and a sweatshirt range to boot!
It’s been a while since we last checked in on Amy Woodside but the New Zealand-born, New York-based graphic artist has been as busy as ever. She’s a creative whose long been fascinated by the visual properties and potential of text and some of her new word-based work explores these qualities in quite an abstract way. She has also just launched a set of printed sweatshirts with the AYR brand, giving some of her pattern work a new lease of life on the sternums of trendy young things the world over. Nice. Amy Woodside has some new paintings and a sweatshirt range to boot!
It’s been a while since we last checked in on Amy Woodside but the New Zealand-born, New York-based graphic artist has been as busy as ever. She’s a creative whose long been fascinated by the visual properties and potential of text and some of her new word-based work explores these qualities in quite an abstract way. She has also just launched a set of printed sweatshirts with the AYR brand, giving some of her pattern work a new lease of life on the sternums of trendy young things the world over. Nice.

Amy Woodside has some new paintings and a sweatshirt range to boot!

It’s been a while since we last checked in on Amy Woodside but the New Zealand-born, New York-based graphic artist has been as busy as ever. She’s a creative whose long been fascinated by the visual properties and potential of text and some of her new word-based work explores these qualities in quite an abstract way. She has also just launched a set of printed sweatshirts with the AYR brand, giving some of her pattern work a new lease of life on the sternums of trendy young things the world over. Nice.

(Source: itsnicethat.com)

Letters From Berlin
Berlin’s Buchstabenmuseum features neon and other display lettering rescued from old buildings and shopfronts, making it a must-see for any type-inclined visitor.
Housed (for the time-being) in an old East Berlin supermarket, the Buchstabenmuseum features hundreds of letters that were casualties of the ceaseless redevelopment of Berlin as well as contributions from elsewhere in Germany. Letters From Berlin
Berlin’s Buchstabenmuseum features neon and other display lettering rescued from old buildings and shopfronts, making it a must-see for any type-inclined visitor.
Housed (for the time-being) in an old East Berlin supermarket, the Buchstabenmuseum features hundreds of letters that were casualties of the ceaseless redevelopment of Berlin as well as contributions from elsewhere in Germany. Letters From Berlin
Berlin’s Buchstabenmuseum features neon and other display lettering rescued from old buildings and shopfronts, making it a must-see for any type-inclined visitor.
Housed (for the time-being) in an old East Berlin supermarket, the Buchstabenmuseum features hundreds of letters that were casualties of the ceaseless redevelopment of Berlin as well as contributions from elsewhere in Germany. Letters From Berlin
Berlin’s Buchstabenmuseum features neon and other display lettering rescued from old buildings and shopfronts, making it a must-see for any type-inclined visitor.
Housed (for the time-being) in an old East Berlin supermarket, the Buchstabenmuseum features hundreds of letters that were casualties of the ceaseless redevelopment of Berlin as well as contributions from elsewhere in Germany.

Letters From Berlin

Berlin’s Buchstabenmuseum features neon and other display lettering rescued from old buildings and shopfronts, making it a must-see for any type-inclined visitor.

Housed (for the time-being) in an old East Berlin supermarket, the Buchstabenmuseum features hundreds of letters that were casualties of the ceaseless redevelopment of Berlin as well as contributions from elsewhere in Germany.

(Source: creativereview.co.uk)

Ume.net’s Living With Lag Experiment

To illustrate how annoying internet lag is, Swedish broadband provider ume.net conducted a fun experiment where lag was brought into the real world, via the use of Oculus Rift headsets.

The ‘living with lag’ experiment was created by ad agency ANR BBDO and brought to life by production company Stopp. Participants wore Oculus Rift headsets that were set with a real life lag of several seconds, and then set about doing average tasks like taking part in an aerobics class or frying an egg. The results are entertaining.

(Source: creativereview.co.uk)

A new crest for The Old Vic
In January 2013, London studio Rose was asked to review and update The Old Vic’s branding. The project is now complete and changes include a new set of typefaces from Colophon and a Royal Crest redrawn by artist Chris Mitchell. 

Rose has been working with The Old Vic since 2004, when it was asked to design the theatre’s production programmes. The studio has since worked on more than 25 campaigns, communications and identities for sub-brands, including The Old Vic in the West End and its 24 Hour Plays Celebrity Gala. Last year, it was asked to review The Old Vic’s identity, define a brand strategy and decide which of its brand assets should be retained or replaced. A new crest for The Old Vic
In January 2013, London studio Rose was asked to review and update The Old Vic’s branding. The project is now complete and changes include a new set of typefaces from Colophon and a Royal Crest redrawn by artist Chris Mitchell. 

Rose has been working with The Old Vic since 2004, when it was asked to design the theatre’s production programmes. The studio has since worked on more than 25 campaigns, communications and identities for sub-brands, including The Old Vic in the West End and its 24 Hour Plays Celebrity Gala. Last year, it was asked to review The Old Vic’s identity, define a brand strategy and decide which of its brand assets should be retained or replaced. A new crest for The Old Vic
In January 2013, London studio Rose was asked to review and update The Old Vic’s branding. The project is now complete and changes include a new set of typefaces from Colophon and a Royal Crest redrawn by artist Chris Mitchell. 

Rose has been working with The Old Vic since 2004, when it was asked to design the theatre’s production programmes. The studio has since worked on more than 25 campaigns, communications and identities for sub-brands, including The Old Vic in the West End and its 24 Hour Plays Celebrity Gala. Last year, it was asked to review The Old Vic’s identity, define a brand strategy and decide which of its brand assets should be retained or replaced. A new crest for The Old Vic
In January 2013, London studio Rose was asked to review and update The Old Vic’s branding. The project is now complete and changes include a new set of typefaces from Colophon and a Royal Crest redrawn by artist Chris Mitchell. 

Rose has been working with The Old Vic since 2004, when it was asked to design the theatre’s production programmes. The studio has since worked on more than 25 campaigns, communications and identities for sub-brands, including The Old Vic in the West End and its 24 Hour Plays Celebrity Gala. Last year, it was asked to review The Old Vic’s identity, define a brand strategy and decide which of its brand assets should be retained or replaced.

A new crest for The Old Vic

In January 2013, London studio Rose was asked to review and update The Old Vic’s branding. The project is now complete and changes include a new set of typefaces from Colophon and a Royal Crest redrawn by artist Chris Mitchell. 

Rose has been working with The Old Vic since 2004, when it was asked to design the theatre’s production programmes. The studio has since worked on more than 25 campaigns, communications and identities for sub-brands, including The Old Vic in the West End and its 24 Hour Plays Celebrity Gala. Last year, it was asked to review The Old Vic’s identity, define a brand strategy and decide which of its brand assets should be retained or replaced.

(Source: creativereview.co.uk)

3rd Coast Surf Fest
kmuellerdesign.com 3rd Coast Surf Fest
kmuellerdesign.com 3rd Coast Surf Fest
kmuellerdesign.com 3rd Coast Surf Fest
kmuellerdesign.com 3rd Coast Surf Fest
kmuellerdesign.com

3rd Coast Surf Fest

kmuellerdesign.com

Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins  Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know
by Aldis Kalnins 

Body Language Secrets Everyone Must Know

by Aldis Kalnins 

(Source: beben-eleben)